A Picture May Spark a Thousand Words

by Artemis Greenleaf

Only through art can we emerge from ourselves and know what another person sees. – Marcel Proust

Jenny_wireframe_071315

What happens when your imaginary friends stop talking to you?

If you’re a writer, it is the dreaded “writer’s block,” that feeling of looking at a blank sheet – paper or screen – and finding that the only thing that comes to mind is the item you forgot when you were at the grocery store yesterday, or perhaps that song that you haven’t heard in years, and never liked anyway, that’s been stuck in your head for the past three days.

Of course, you can get up and take a walk, do yoga, or make another cup of coffee. Those things might help. Sometimes taking a hot shower is all that is needed to wash away the blockages and get the creative juices flowing.

But here’s another suggestion. If you really want to get into your characters and get them talking to you again, draw them. Draw things in their world. Paint the villains they face. What does your main character’s bedroom look like? What color is her kitchen? What kind of music does your main character listen to when he’s working out? Does he go to the gym or do it at home? What does that look like? It’s okay if the drawings aren’t perfect. It’s fine if the paintings are so cringe-worthy that you’d never show them to anyone. But the more you do, the better you will get at it. If you spend some time making a trailer for your book, it means you will spend a lot of time looking at (or creating) images/videos that you find evocative of the feelings and situations your characters are in. You will also be looking for music that sets the tone of at least the current scene, if not the entire work. Listen to it. Listen to it while you’re drawing/painting/sculpting.

Sometimes I draw with pencils, but mostly, I use a 3D modelling and rendering package called Blender and PhotoShop (I have a Creative Cloud subscription). Blender does have quite a steep learning curve (but there are tons of video tutorials out there to get you going). If PhotoShop CC or even Elements isn’t in your budget, Gimp or Paint.Net might work for you. Besides getting you back on track with your characters, there are added benefits to learning a new skill: 1) you have a new skill! Congratulations; and 2) it keeps your brain sharp, and may help ward off dementia as you get older.

Jenny_closeup_071315

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About Artemis Greenleaf

Artemis Greenleaf has devoured fairy tales, folk tales and ghost stories since before she could read. Artemis did, in fact, marry an alien and she lives in the suburban wilds of Houston, Texas with her husband, two children and assorted pets. She writes both fiction and non-fiction and her work has appeared in magazines and as novels. For more information, please visit artemisgreenleaf.com.

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