Inside the Palisade – an Interview with K.C. Maguire

by Artemis Greenleaf

InsidePalisadeHello! It’s my turn to post, and I have the honor of interviewing our own fabulous K.C. Maguire.

Thanks for interviewing me this week.

Congratulations, K.C., on your upcoming release, Inside the Palisade. Your latest novel is a YA sci-fi dystopia about a teen named Omega who has been raised in an all-female community, and one day happens on a boy who is absolutely, positively not supposed to be there. Would you tell us a little bit about Omega? What is her life like inside the Palisade?

 Omega actually leads a pretty bland life until she meets Ghent (the hidden boy) and starts to learn the truth about her cloistered society. She lives alone with her mother and works in a clothes factory. She has always suspected she’s a little different from everyone else, partly because of her weird eyes in a society where everyone else is genetically engineered to be perfect, and partly because she’s always thought there must be more to life than what she’s seen so far. She discovers that she’s right, but it’s a dangerous journey.

The best journeys always are! Your protagonist is named Omega. The Omega symbol (Ω) was used in Vietnam War draft protests. In computer science, it refers to a missing (null) or inapplicable value. Is there a symbolic connection to her name?

 Partly. I decided to use Greek letters for all the women’s names as a way of “ordering” the society. Women are given Greek letters as first names which they often shorten or change to nicknames. I picked Omega for my protagonist because I wanted to be able to shorten it to “Meg” as an homage to my youngest daughter who was just born when I started the book.

What is the reasoning behind banning men from the community, and how was it accomplished?

 This is a dystopian society where war and violence has ravaged the world outside the palisade. Over the years, a mythology has developed among the women that the men were to blame for all the violence (which, of course, isn’t true, but it comes to be accepted). Men weren’t initially banned, but gradually died out and weren’t replaced as women figured out how to genetically engineer babies to be girls.

 What inspired this story?

In my other life I work in a very male dominated profession and I often leave meetings thinking things like “it would be so much better if women were in charge.” Of course, I don’t really believe this, but it was a thought experiment as to what *might* happen if women actually were in charge. I’m not the first author to experiment with this idea, but many YA sci-fi books have large male character presences even if the protagonist is a woman. I thought it might be fun to turn the idea on its head and see what happens.

My 7th grader is attending an all-girls school this year. What advice would Omega give her?

I went to an all girls school for a while myself and I didn’t like it much. Girls on their own can be very catty and bitchy, although they can also be wonderful and I made some great friends at that school. My advice to anyone starting any school or new social situation is to just be yourself. If you’re honest about who you are and what you want, you’ll never be disappointed in yourself. And if other folks can’t accept that, they’re probably not the best friends for you anyway.

 You’ve created a rich sci-fi world inside the Palisade, where women depend on technology for the survival of their community. What impact has this technology had on their evolution as a species?

 In many ways these women have over-relied on technology while resources and personnel have dwindled. If they’d had less technology and had to work on new ways to move forward as a society, they might have done better in the long run.

 You’ve gotten some rave reviews on Amazon. Is this book the first in a series, or will you leave readers guessing about what happens to Omega?

 I didn’t necessarily plan it as the first in a series but I always knew it had “series potential” in the sense that there’s a lot more that is likely to happen to the young protagonists after the story closes. I’ve actually toyed with an idea for a sequel based on another character’s perspective. In many ways, Omega has fulfilled her character arc in this book, but there’s a lot of room for growth for a number of the supporting cast featured in this book.

I know that you write across several genres, but focusing on sci-fi, who are the top five authors who have inspired you the most?

 I love so many authors that it’s hard to narrow it down to five. Of the more classic sci-fi writers, I love Ray Bradbury and enjoy Robert Heinlein and Philip K. Dick. Of the more contemporary writers, I love Karen Lord, A.M. Dellamonica, and Nalo Hopkinson. There’s also a short story writer (Ray Vukcevich) who is kind of like the Salvador Dali of sci-fi short stories.

There are so many genres because people enjoy different kinds of stories. What kind of reader will love this book

I really think the audience for this book is people who like a fast-paced action story and tend to enjoy “what if” scenarios. There’s a touch of adventure and romance, but it’s mainly a thought experiment about what an all-gal society would look like with past pacing, lots of twists and turns and (hopefully) unexpected reveals.

Finally, would you share an excerpt from the book with us?

 Here’s a little snippet from the middle of the book when Omega and Ghent are arguing about why the women use Greek letters for names and what the options used to be…

“Why the name Ghent? Where did it come from?”

He shakes his head, causing his matted hair to flutter around his ears. “My mothers never liked the Greek letters.”

“And I guess it would be weird for a boy”—I stumble over the unfamiliar word—“to be called Alpha or Beta or something.”

“You don’t think it’s weird for girls to have those names?” He seems upset. I turn away, not knowing what I said wrong.

There’s a rustle of blankets and in a moment he’s on his knees in front of me. The intensity of his gaze makes me feel weak. “Don’t

you see? It’s another way the society controls you. Forces you to conform.” He reaches for me, but I jerk away.

He massages his neck as if in pain. Then he looks over at the bookcase. “Hold on,” he says as he rushes to it and traces his

fingers along the cardboard edges that jut out along the shelves. Obviously searching for something. With a rush of breath, he

pulls out an object. An antique book with a tattered cover. He flips it open. I can’t hide my curiosity. I’ve never seen a paper

book before. I move over to him and kneel by his side. He’s not handling the object with the care I would expect. Instead, he flips

through the pages with his thumb. The paper makes a crackling sound. I lean across until I can see the words, printed in real ink.

“Here it is. Listen to this.” He looks up at me before turning his attention to the object in his lap.

He’s going to read to me. A thrill of anticipation shoots through me. In a melodic voice, he begins, and it’s as if a

thousand butterflies have been released in my stomach.

“My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing

longer or more explicit than Pip. So I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip. I gave Pirrip as my family’s name, on the

authority of his tombstone and my sister – Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith.”

My eyes close as the ancient words fill me, rolling from the deman’s tongue like silk. I’ve never heard anything this strange

before, at least not from a book.

“Do you like it?” he asks.

My eyes fly open when I realize he’s speaking to me.

“What is it?” I ask.

“It’s called Great Expectations.”

“I don’t understand. What does it mean?”

“This part”—he taps his finger over the paragraph he read— “means that people didn’t always use Greek letters for names.

They were able to choose names for themselves. Even make up nicknames, like Pip did.”

“That’s not such a big deal. We use nicknames now. You call your mothers Del and Epsie,” I say, but the words ring hollow.

Nicknames don’t seem like such a great innovation when we only have twenty-four names to choose from.

 

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A Fantasy Interview: Almost as good as fantasy baseball–

by Mandy Broughton

Last Friday, Houston Writers Guild launched its new anthology, Tides of Impossibility. This collection of fantasy short stories is written by some of the field’s up-and-coming stars. And everyone knows what happens when I hear about a book launch–I find myself a new person to interview. After a flurry of emails, I was able to hunt down speak with one of the editors, C. Stuart Hardwick.

TOI

Mandy Broughton: I’m always curious how editors are chosen. Kyle Russell selected you as a co-editor on the Tides of Impossibility Fantasy Anthology. Is it true that when you gave Kyle a sample of your editing style, you used a gallon bucket of red paint versus a red pen? And you told him the tears of writers fuel you like Dilithium crystals do the Enterprise?

C. Stuart Hardwick: That’s a vile rumor started by the guy Kyle pays to clean out our buckets! Actually, editing an anthology is as much about time and energy as line editing. You spend a lot of time with each story, and you want it to be as pleasant as possible. Kyle and I had worked together promoting the scifi anthology, so we knew we had compatible tastes and temperaments. The guild has done a lot for me, so I was eager to give back. The rest was easy.

MB: Easy-peasy-lemon-squeezy. Hmm. I see distinct lines separating science fiction, fantasy, and horror, mostly determined on the basis if the story contains robots, magicians, or men in hockey masks. You write mostly science-fiction, but as an editor for a fantasy anthology, what do you see the differences among the three genres?

CSH: That sums it up rather well. It’s principally a topical difference, though fantasy readers are a bit more into world building, and horror of course has its own take on tension and pacing, and each follows its own tropes and conventions. But beneath all that, stories are about people, and the best are about interesting people in interesting circumstances changing in interesting ways. That’s what we tried to put into Tides.

I’ve found that the more I work in the field, the less I feel tied to any one sub-genre. If you asked me to recommend three books right now, they’d be Andy Weir’s The Martian, Tim Powers’ On Stranger Tides, and Randy Henderson’s debut, Finn Fancy Necromancy. That’s one hard scifi and two fantasy, and all thoroughly enjoyable. What really drew me to scifi was how readily it skirts reality to act as a foil or lens through which we can view ourselves. But storytelling is more than social commentary. Space opera like Star Wars is arguably really fantasy with a technological aesthetic, and many of my perennial favorites, from Groundhog Day to SyFy’s Warehouse 13, are fantasies that I enjoy for the character arcs as mush as the plot conceit, which is why I think Robert Heinlein has the right idea in championing “speculative fiction” as an umbrella term.. 

MB: [An aside: Warehouse 13 BRILLIANT!] Okay, speaking of speculative fiction, umbrellas, and the great Robert Heinlein, you have been rubbing elbows with the top echelon of science-fiction. Tell us about your awards and publications.

CSH: I was fortunate enough to win the L Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future contest last year, and they flew me to LA for a week long workshop taught by Tim Powers and Dave Farland. I got to meet a whole slew of scifi legends, from Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven to Nancy Kress and Nina Kiriki Hoffman. I dined with Starlog founder, Kerry O’Quinn, shared pizza with Robert J Sawyer, and spent the evening of my birthday standing out on Hollywood Boulevard watching the lunar eclipse with my awesome new writer friends.

I was also a finalist for the Jim Baen Memorial award and a semifinalist for the BSFA’s James White award, and I’m tremendously proud of making those lists. WotF, though, really lit the fire for me. It’s oddly humbling to be welcomed by such an array of luminaries who tell you in no uncertain terms, that while you have the ability, making it or not is still a long slog of hard work and perseverance.

MB: Is it true when Orson Scott Card asked you for your autograph that you told him to get to the end of the line with the rest of the losers?

CSH: Nooo. I think when Orson stepped up, I may have giggled like a little girl while I tried and failed to think up something memorable to write. Ender’s Game is once of my absolute favorites. And Orson was wearing sneakers with his suit, the devil.

MB: Sneakers with his suit, I like that almost as much as I love Ender’s Game. In your bio, you’ve mentioned that you’ve worn a cape. Readers want to know, when wearing the cape, who do you most resemble Bela Lugosi, Snidely Whipslash, or Batman?

CSH: Lugosi, of course. I was in a college production of Dracula. I’ve been told I have a light foot-step. That experience was very valuable, as my Van Helsing was always loosing his place in the script, and I found that you don’t get stage fright if you have something outside yourself to worry about. The image on my website landing page is of me sharing that advice on stage at the Ebell theater in LA.

MB: Anything else you’ve like to share?

CSH: Yes, Everyone check out Galaxy’s Edge magazine, issue 14., where my story appears along with those of Robert A. Heinlein, Larry Niven, Nancy Kress, David Brin, and Alan Dean Foster, among others. Galaxy’s Edge is edited by the inestimable Mike Resnick and filled with scifi and unique and quirky fantasy far afield of the traditional fae and dragon fare My story, Luck of the Chieftain’s Arrow, is a good example, about an elemental spirit that learns about love and loss as the copper it’s trapped in is passed down through human history.

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MB: I do believe May, 2015 is when your story will appear. Everyone check it out, it’ll be on the final exam. Thanks again, Stuart. Great work on the anthology. I’m looking forward to the release of Tides of Impossibility.

CSH: Me too. It’s has quite a variety and some really compelling worlds and characters. I know everyone will find something to their liking.

MB: Artemis Greenleaf has an excellent story in the collection as well a humorous piece from yours truly. That’s it. I hope everyone enjoys. **looks around** Hmm, I believe Stuart still has my pen I loaned him last Friday at the signing…

TOI

Would You Date this Protagonist?

dating

By Ellen Leventhal

I love character driven stories. Great characters become your friends. They hit a chord in your heart. You don’t have to like them, but they should evoke some type of emotion. Are they kind? Funny? Quirky? Certain characters stay with us forever. Is it weird that I wanted to name my first born either Scout or Atticus? As a writer, there are hundreds of ways to develop characters, and I’ve used a bunch. They were all good, but now I’d like to share a new one with you. Match.com. Stay with me on this.

I have been happily married for close to 44 years, but for some reason I get match.com emails almost weekly. I’ve now also been introduced to the ranks of eHarmony and my new favorite, OurTime.com (for mature couples). Obviously, the internet knows I’m old. It just doesn’t know I’m married. Or doesn’t care.  My inbox is a virtual cornucopia of “singles in my area.” One day last week, being of curious mind and wanting to put off real work, I decided to look around a little. You know, just for fun. And then it hit me. The Constant Contact gods did not want me to leave my husband and troll the internet for people looking for love in all the wrong places. They sent these lovelorn souls to me for something much more interesting. Character development! You want to know a character? Read the online dating profiles and then write one of your own. I’d like to introduce you to three characters you may meet in some of my stories.

Ms. Magnificent is a 5’10” (6’ in her Jimmy Choos) Texan with a heart bigger than Southfork. She has been hurt, yet she doesn’t let that stop her from trying to find love. She believes that everyone is basically good, and she is kind to everyone. Those Prada sunglasses she sports may keep out UV rays, but they are rose colored and has caused her some disappointment. But don’t worry. She bounces back for more! She wears her heart on her her Stella McCartney dress sleeves, and when she is upset, y’all will know it. She feels sure that her Prince Charming is right around the corner. Could it be you? Ms. M. likes mocha frappacinos (sugarfree, no fat) arugala salad (dressing on the side), and long walks. (But not in the rain because her hair has a tendency towards frizzing). Ms. Magnificent is an animal lover. She rescues puppies and kittens, and her favorite farm animal is a unicorn. She doesn’t eat carbs, but she’s a wonderful baker. That’s not the only reason they call her Cup Cake. Call to find out more.

Mr. Macho is 6’2” and muscular. He has been divorced for five years, and he enjoys life to the utmost. His luxurious hair is almost to his shoulders because he doesn’t care that it’s not 1969 anymore. He’s a people lover and wants to love as many people as possible. He sometimes gets sad when he thinks of his ex-wife because she is really pretty and rich. They only divorced because she took advantage of his good nature and had a crazy idea that their relationship should be monogamous. He’s too much of a giver to only give to one person. He is also too much of a man to be told what to do. He believes women should be treated like ladies all the time. He opens doors and makes decisions for them. He doesn’t want “his girls” to work too hard. If you want to have fun, and you have very low self-esteem, call him. He’ll answer if he feels like it.

Ms. March wants you to know that’s her name, not her title. And it will be Dr. March as soon as she finished her PhD. She is a biology professor at a prestigious university. She’s never been married because her career comes first. Although she spurns the institution of marriage, she’d like someone to spend time with and possibly travel with her to third world countries. She likes politics, but is open minded. As long as you agree with her. Ms. March does not want to be categorized by political party, race, or religion, but she will not date a Republican. If you don’t recycle, don’t call her. She will have to clear her chakras after being with you, and who has time for that? A perfect date would be margaritas on the beach and an anti-war demonstration. Call and find out why they call her Top Shelf.

So there you have it. Put any of these people together and watch what happens. Thanks, match.com! Research comes in all forms.

 

 

The Philadelphia Experiment

The Black Cats

The Black Cats

No, not that one. This one.

Artemis Greenleaf here. Today I’m interviewing the multi-talented Monica Shaughnessy, and we’ll be discussing The Black Cats, the latest installment in her Edgar Allen Poe historical fiction series.

AG: You have a wide variety of books – an Easter picture book, a mid-grade superhero story, and some young adult romances, all for the 18-and-under set. How did you get from kid lit to adult historical fiction?

MS: I’m lucky (unlucky?) enough to have a brain that jumps from one thing to the next. I constantly crave variety. When it doesn’t come to me, I seek it out. When I can’t find it on the bookshelf, I write it! I guess the word for it is eclectic. This isn’t just how I write books, though. It’s how I live my life. In the car, I listen to Hank Williams and Rage Against the Machine. In the kitchen, I experiment with tagine cooking one night and wok cooking the next. You get the idea. On the flipside, “eclectic” turns to “scattered” if I don’t stay focused.

AG: Why did you choose Edgar Allen Poe’s cat as the POV character? Do you have a tortoiseshell cat yourself?

MS: The idea for this series began with a wish: to write a cat cozy. I really like mysteries, and the cozy market seemed like a good place to dive in with my adult writing. This, of course, lead to the idea of Edgar Allan Poe’s cat. So I had a choice – either narrate from Eddy’s perspective or from Cattarina’s. Since there’s something a little sacred about the master, I decided not to write from his POV. How can anyone truly know the mind of a genius? Alas, I didn’t realize that I had a third, and no less interesting, choice: Eddy’s wife, Sissy. In early outlines, however, I didn’t understand her pivotal role in the story. But now, Cattarina has taken on a life of her own. One reader even called her a diva. (so true!) And about that tortoiseshell…no, I don’t have such a creature in my home. But my grandmother was blessed with one. If I had to describe that tortie in a single word, it would be feisty.

AG: Eddie just had a birthday. Did you do anything special? Raise a glass in his honor? What is your favorite work by Poe?

MS: Sadly, his birthday passed without much notice in my house. I was hard at work on a ghostwriting project for a client, and the date zipped right by. But next year, when I’ve completed my Cattarina series, I’ll probably have a big book sale in his honor. (How else do indie authors celebrate?) My favorite work by Poe would have to be the poem, “Annabel Lee.” I even allude to it in my novella, The Black Cats. Though it was written years after “The Black Cat,” I suspect he received his inspiration much earlier.

AG: Your first Cattarina book, The Tell-Tail Heart, came out last spring, and you’ve just released a prequel (To the River) and a second Cattarina Mystery – The Black Cats. Are you planning on doing a Cattarina book for every Poe story? Poe died a mysterious death – is Cattarina going to have anything to say about that?

MS: From what we know, Poe acquired Cattarina (or she acquired him) in Philadelphia. So many of his early works are out of the question. After he left Philadelphia and moved to New York, he eventually brought Cattarina over, along with his mother-in-law. But during those later years, he traveled quite a bit due to his growing fame over “The Raven.” Sadly, he and Catters spent more and more time apart. This would make writing about his later works somewhat problematic. That’s why I chose to concentrate on his “golden days” in Philadelphia, where he was on the cusp of fame. And it’s a fascinating city to write about. To answer your second question, Cattarina won’t have much to say about Eddy’s passing because they were apart when it happened (he was in Baltimore, and she was in New York) AND they both died within days of each other. Bittersweet, no?

AG: Not unlike Lord Carnarvon’s terrier. What did you enjoy most about writing The Black Cats?

MS: I enjoyed writing about the interpersonal relationship between Eddy and Sissy. Since temperance and drinking to excess are the thematic elements of Poe’s “The Black Cat,” I used these as a springboard to explore the ups and downs of what I’m sure was a very rocky marriage at times. It’s no secret that Mr. Poe leaned toward alcoholism. And while he’s inebriated during several scenes in my book, I never say, “He was drunk.” Even his wife and mother-in-law never say it. Why? I suppose out of respect for the man. I wanted to discuss his problems in a way that didn’t tarnish him.

AG: 1840’s Philadelphia really comes alive in this story. Have you been to the city? Do they have a Poe tour?

MS: I would LOVE to visit Philadelphia one day. But we mostly vacation in places we can drive to (we own an RV), and Pennsylvania is a loooooong way from Texas. I’ve been bugging my husband about it lately. So we’ll see. J But! I have been to Richmond, Virginia, where I visited the Poe Museum. It’s a lovely place, but a thin substitute for his actual home. And yes, they give tours of his former dwelling on North Seventh in Philly. I watched hours of video footage, both from the National Parks Service and from amateurs, so I could get a sense of the interior.

AG: What projects are you working on now?

MS: Right now, I’m finishing up a collection of horror/suspense stories that I plan to release in February (fingers crossed!), titled Hell Cent and Other Fine Stories of Death and Dismemberment. After that, I’m going to start on the third book in the Cattarina Mysteries series: The Raven of Liberty. At the book’s conclusion, she inspires…. Well, I don’t have to tell you, do I? It’s obvious from the title!

AG: Ooooh! I’m looking forward to reading that. Thanks for stopping by and sharing with us.

 

 

Strong Women and We’re Not Talking Body Odor

This is Mandy Broughton. [taps mic] Is this thing working? [feedback noise] Mandy Broughton here with another victim, er, guest for my hot seat.

Several weeks ago, Patricia Flaherty Pagan had asked me to read an advanced review copy of her upcoming anthology, Eve’s Requiem: Tales of Women, Mystery, and Horror. Once I finished it, I knew I needed to add Ms. Pagan to my collection of torturees interviewees.

Eve'sRequiemCOVERfront

These thirteen short stories are about real women in extraordinary situations. Okay, it has horror so it’s not all fun and bonbons. But they are all powerful women who take an active role in their fate. And they pack quite a punch without any of the benefits of spandex costumes.

MB: The upcoming anthology, Eve’s Requiem, co-edited by you and Fern Brady, will be released in October. The collection features strong female characters, good and bad, in dangerous situations. But I noticed Ms. Brady’s name is listed first. To keep with the theme of strong females, is it true you two arm wrestled to see whose name would be on top?

PFP: Alas there was no arm wrestling or WWF (wild writing females) style smackdowns. It is the publishing industry’s custom to list the editors alphabetically, so that it how we did it. We were blessed to worth with excellent writers and fun stories, but compiling an anthology is a lot of work, so it was helpful to share the process.

MB: Doing a collection of short stories with female leads can be risky. And none of the characters, to my recollection, were six feet tall, weighed 100 pounds and could bench press 315 twenty times without breaking a sweat. Are you afraid that you might have alienated the spandex-karate-Jiu-Jitsu-superhero-big-breasted reading demographic?

PFP: The Jiu-Jitsu loving crowd shouldn’t underestimate the characters in Eve’s Requiem. The shotgun- wielding, elderly aunt in Wendy Leeds’ story “Bloodline” could take out an action movie heroine any day!
But seriously, stories celebrating characters who look more like the average reader are slowly but surely being published in America. Not that we don’t have further to go. My own mission-oriented small press has set the goal of publishing more fiction about women from diverse backgrounds. America isn’t full of tall, skinny, white chicks, so American bookshelves shouldn’t be either.

MB: I see you have several events celebrating the release of Eve’s Requiem: Tales of Women, Mystery, and Horror. My book events tend to include coercion, duct-tape, and lots of dragging of bound bodies. I’ve come to realize this might not be the most productive way to approach book signings. What do you see as the recipe for success at book events?

PFP: So far the secret ingredients seem to be:
1. Cupcakes
2. Organized friends
3. Accessibility
4. More cupcakes
At the reading and launch to celebrate the publishing of Up, Do Spider Road Press’ collection of flash fiction by women, we served gourmet cupcakes from a well-known Heights cupcake bakery. It’s amazing how much more interesting writers sound while you’re devouring just the right amount of chocolate ganache! We will therefore continue the tradition and serve gourmet cupcakes at our Eve’s Requiem launch party at Writespace Houston on Friday, October 10 at 8 pm. Stop in to hear good stories and or to eat cupcakes. Either way, it works for me.

Thankfully, I have also lucked into meeting some organized and motivated author friends since moving to Houston. Tireless author-preneur Pamela Fagan Hutchins and enthusiastic novelist Gay Yellen have graciously invited me to join in on some of the Women of Mystery readings this fall. I will not be involved in the catering, but I am honored to be invited to read with such a talented group. These group readings will feature several power-house authors, including best-selling novelist Stephanie Jaye Evans and this wacky author named Mandy Broughton. Houstonians can stop into the Barnes and Noble in River Oaks on Saturday, October 18 at 2 p.m. to investigate.

Accessibility is everyone’s problem, so I am also trying to set up events that all readers can enjoy. I am happy that we are able to hold out upcoming launch at Writespace, a great writers’ organization that also happens to be located in a handicapped accessible building. In addition, I was able to book an ASL interpreter for the event. I hope that Spider Road Press will have the resources to hire ASL interpreters for future events as well. Because all readers like fiction and cupcakes.

MB: Finally, I enjoyed your story, “Bitter Sweets,” also found in this collection. Of all the tales, I think it had the most realistic feel, as if it could have occurred. Readers demand to know, did you sneak into Doc Brown’s laboratory and borrow his DeLorean to go to 1919 Boston to do research?

PFP: I would love to see the look on people’s faces if I did roll into 1919 Boston in a DeLorean. The streetcar drivers and ice delivery men would be seriously spooked!

While I couldn’t count on Doc Brown, my AP history teacher and community college lecturer dad pointed me towards the historical facts. In fact, his joy in telling the story of the real life, surreal molasses flood in Boston’s North End in January, 1919 planted the seed for the story. For more details, I borrowed his copy of historian Stephen Puleo’s great book about the disaster, Dark Tide. Nonfiction sometimes bores me, but Puelo writes well about a truth that was just as strange as fiction. I highly recommend his book.

If readers are interested in checking out my story and the twelve other suspenseful tales of peril and survival in Eve’s Requiem, they can save money by preordering it for a discounted rate between now and 10/5/14. See Spider Road Press’ online store for more information.

Spider Road Press

MB: Thanks so much for the interview and good luck with the launch. I look forward to cupcakes buying a sighed copy.

PFP: Thanks for the chat!

Eve'sRequiemCOVERfront

 

Read it! You’ll never look at flower gardens, haunted houses, dark roads, walking home from work, and 1919 Boston the same way again.

 

And, dear readers, in the great capitalistic tradition, I have a word from my sponsor.

[begin commercial] My book, The Cat’s Last Meow, is being featured on Monday September 29th 2014 at eBookSoda, a new readers’ site where they’ll send you ebook recommendations tailored to your taste. www.ebooksoda.com. I’ve found some good deals there. It’s kind of fun browsing. [end commercial]

 

Interview with Laurie Schnebly – podcast

LaurieEnneagrams

Click to find me at Amazon

by Artemis Greenleaf

Listen to the Laurie Schnebly Interview  here

Show notes:

Laurie Schnebly’s own website: http://booklaurie.com/

Writer University: http://writeruniv.wordpress.com/

Romance University blog post: http://romanceuniversity.org/2014/08/29/braiding-your-story-with-laurie-schnebly-campbell/

November Kiss of Death RWA class http://www.rwamysterysuspense.org/coffinClass.php?classdetail=m1.nov

The Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the Nine Types of People, Renee Baron and Elizabeth Wagele http://www.amazon.com/The-Enneagram-Made-Easy-Discover/dp/0062510266

For a transcript of the interview, go here